Dell Channel Partners Embrace Dell Software Competencies and Increase Registrations and Revenue as Dell Software Incentives and Training Programs Gain Traction

  • Dell Software deal registration up 61 percent year over year and revenue growth has increased 15 percent since Q2 last year
  • The Dell Channel program has attained substantial growth since announcement of new software competencies and software learning paths in September 2013
  • Partners have invested hundreds of hours to understand Dell Software’s strategy and solutions and completed more than 37,000 Dell Software training courses in the past year
  • First advanced competency – Network Security – to launch this month

Dell has registered significant growth in its software offerings and revenue through PartnerDirect partners since new software-specific enhancements and initiatives went into effect in September 2013. Today partners can sell all Dell software solutions and secure associated rebates to drive the growth of their businesses. Channel partners have embraced the opportunity to offer customers Dell’s end-to-end solutions, putting Dell Software on a strong trajectory.

“This is a great story of transformation and success. 10 years ago Dell was known as a hardware company that didn’t need partners,” said Darren Bibby, vice president of Channels and Alliances Research at IDC.  “Today, Dell has added software to its stack to become one of the world’s largest software companies, with the majority of revenue coming from channel partners.  Its focus on service provider programs is welcome as that community grows in size and importance.  In addition, the large focus on training and enablement is paying off.”

“IDC’s opinion is that partners can no longer be viewed as mostly product focused, services focused, or resale focused,” said Bibby. “Programs like PartnerDirect with a flexible engagement model for partners selling a mix of hardware, software and services allow partners to forge their own form of relationship in alignment with their unique business models and strategies.”

“One year ago, we integrated the unique partner programs of legacy Dell software businesses into one set of software competencies under the PartnerDirect program. We bolstered it with a vast array of benefits to help partners expand their revenue potential and scope of their customer relationships,” said Marvin Blough, executive director of Worldwide Channels and Alliances for Dell Software. “The results have been tremendous – with nearly 60 percent of Dell Software’s sales volume going through the channel on a global basis, fueling growth for both Dell partners and Dell. After moving to a single Dell channel program, everything from deal registration and revenue to partner adoption of the software portfolio and training against it has grown incrementally.”

Since the integration of Dell Software with the Dell Channel program, Dell and its channel partners have achieved many milestones, including the following in the recently completed second quarter of Dell’s fiscal year 2015:

  • Dell Software in the channel achieved 15 percent revenue growth year over year, including 42 percent year over year growth in information management, 20 percent in systems management, and 7 percent in security.
  • Key lines that experienced explosive growth include integration software at 274 percent year over year, with double digit gains in data protection, data management and enterprise mobility management.
  • The channel has grown to represent almost 60 percent of Dell Software’s global volume.
  • Individual software deal registrations climbed 61 percent year over year and the value of those registered deals grew 32 percent quarter over quarter.
  • The number of hardware partners taking on software competencies has grown by 8% year over year.

Additionally, Dell Software partners have taken advantage of the PartnerDirect training and competency programs in record numbers:

  • Since September, almost 11,000 individuals at partner organizations completed more than 37,000 Dell Software training courses.
  • Dell Software is also seeing a steady growth in course completions with a 102 percent increase in partner software course completions to date in fiscal year 2015 and a 50 increase in unique individuals taking the courses quarter over quarter.
  • The data protection and security training topics are attracting particularly heavy partner interest. Among the software training courses completed by partners in the second quarter, 40 percent covered data protection and 27 percent security.

Dell’s software division has become one of the largest software companies in the world, selling to 90 percent of Fortune 1,000 companies and supported by 6,000 dedicated software employees worldwide. The Dell Service Provider Program now includes more than 150 Dell Software products available to service providers via flexible subscription pricing and billing to suit each organization’s unique needs.

“Corporate IT Solutions has been a Dell Premier Partner since the program began. Our commitment to Dell as a go-to-market strategy has been validated over the last few years with the continued investment Dell has made in the channel,” said Karen Penticost, Director, Vendor Relations, Corporate IT Solutions. “Dell continues to deliver very compelling end-to-end solutions that meet the needs of our customers, and this has been amplified by Dell’s strengthened efforts in software. The new channel has enabled our firm to expand our footprint and increase revenue, which makes this a focused business strategy for Corporate IT Solutions.”

The changes instituted one year ago have enabled Dell Software partners to take advantage of important PartnerDirect benefits. Among them are new paths to Premier status, including a blended competency for partners selling Dell’s end-to-end hardware and software offerings, rewards for training and sales achievement through Dell Partner AdvantEdge, marketing and market development funding for lead generation, and white glove support from the Certified Partner Resource Desk. Since then, Dell has further accelerated the pace of Dell Software channel growth by introducing the first Dell advanced competency in network security. Additionally, Dell appointed key leaders to support the channel go-to-market strategy, including Ronnie Wilson to vice president and general manager of Dell Software Group EMEA and Dave Hansen to global vice president and general manager, Dell Software sales, marketing services.

Further Details

For partners interested in learning more about the end-to-end solutions including software available through Dell PartnerDirect, please visit here.

Dell World

Join us Nov.4-6 at Dell World 2014, Dell’s premier customer event exploring how technology solutions and services provide organizations a better way to accelerate business’ ability to innovate. Learn more at www.dellworld.com and follow #DellWorld on Twitter.

About Dell

Dell Inc. listens to customers and delivers innovative technology and services that give them the power to do more. For more information, visit www.dell.com.  

Microsoft Believes It is Going to Die

During the dot-com bubble, a number of fascinating ideas emerged, all of which were thought to be the next big thing. I hosted a cable channel discussion panel on TechTV right in the midst of the boom and heard all of them. Most turned out to be bullcrap.

Here are a few of the trends that were going to change everything.
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  • Grocery stores were going to die in favor of direct home delivery.
  • Physical retail stores were going to die in favor of online stores and direct home delivery.
  • There is something called a new economy, so when you judged things using concepts such as profit or margins or practicality, you were wrong.
  • The browser would become the operating system.
  • Disintermediation (cutting out the middle man using the Internet) would dominate the decades ahead.

A couple of ideas that pre-dated the dot com era became part of the dot com canon. They continue to this day and are still my favorites:
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  • The future of computing is client-server (today, we call that “the cloud”).
  • Windows is dead.
  • Microsoft Office is dead.

The client-server meme has been around since the 1980s as a counter-revolution to the personal computer’s appearance in the late 1970s. Once people realized that these machines were not toys, as naysayers earlier claimed, but were instead devices to empower the individual, they had to be stopped.

Back in the day, we called this client-server stuff by names like “thin-client computing” or “network computing.” But only “cloud computing” could put the PC juggernaut in its place! Yeah, right.

OpinionsThe “Windows is dead” line (along with the Office is dead meme) hit its stride in the late 1990s and dominated the conversation throughout the decade after that. I first heard it explained to me in Boston around 1998 and began to see it used as a “fact” in Silicon Valley thereafter. It’s still a “fact” somehow and the proof is entirely in the love affair the world is having with the Google Chromebook—a completely useless machine as far as I’m concerned

Curiously, nothing except the Mac OS from Apple has done anything to come close to challenging Windows in the marketplace.

When someone suggests that maybe a vendor should develop a real strong OS—other than Linux, of course—to challenge Windows the response is always: “Why? The desktop computer is also dead.”

In some funny and odd way, Microsoft itself has bought into this nonsense. It keeps wasting money looking for exit strategies but it remains in business. Instead of marketing Windows and Office with a sincere belief that they will be around forever (that’s the proper approach) Microsoft believes the meme, which has yet to be proven, and fails to market against them. This is astonishing to anyone paying attention. What is wrong with these people? Buying Minecraft is not the answer.

Microsoft should simply look at Adobe. It’s a company with self-confidence about its own products. A meme cropping up that “Photoshop is dead” or “Illustrator is dead” never happens. That’s because the company actually likes what it is doing. It keeps its foot on the gas pedal and improves its products at a breakneck speed. This is the antithesis of Microsoft, which prefers to fret about the future and give up on products. As an example: the tale of Microsoft FrontPage, the long-dead Web development tool, is worth a Harvard case study.

This lack of self-confidence dominates Microsoft. It results in a lackluster response by the public to things such as the Windows Phone. That handset OS should be marketed as the only alternative to Apple’s iOS. Android should be seen as just an iOS clone, which it is. Yet how is Windows Phone marketed? What is its image? I have no idea; neither does Microsoft. When does Windows Phone come up in the conversation about smartphones? Never. How often was it mentioned during the iPhone 6 rollout? Not at all. Does Microsoft ever leverage the fact that it invented the idea of a smartphone? Nope.

Microsoft is a company that lost its mojo and self-confidence in the late 1990s and has no clue what to do about it.

Maybe defending its turf, rather than surrendering, would be a start. It could fight back with a serious rebuke of the cloud and market against it—the stupid cloud is a counter-revolutionary concept taking us all back to centralized computing, where users have no control at all. But instead it buys into the whole idea! It’s mind-boggling.

Well, at least now the Microsofties can spend time playing Minecraft in their copious spare time, in between bouts of worry and self-doubt.

Dell and IDV Solutions Team to Deliver Enterprise-Class Global Risk Visualization with Integrated Communications to Help Organizations Take Action and Mitigate Risk

  • Cloud-based solution enables organizations to visualize, assess and mitigate risks to people and assets, anywhere and anytime
  • Integration of Dell AlertFind Enterprise Notification service with Visual Command Center enterprise risk visualization solution from IDV Solutions, maintains business continuity with 24/7 proactive monitoring and global alerting

Dell Software today announced the integration of its cloud-based AlertFind Enterprise Notification service with leading enterprise risk visualization solution Visual Command Center, from IDV Solutions.  With this integration, organizations using Visual Command Center to monitor global risk events – including severe weather, political unrest, or natural disasters –  that could threaten people and facilities around the world now can instantly communicate and get critical information to affected employees via the AlertFind emergency mass notification service. 

Organizations concerned about risk management have many threats to consider. Natural disasters – hurricanes, earthquakes, fires, tsunamis – seem to be occurring across the globe with increasing frequency. The growing global risk from terrorism also poses threats to the people and assets of organizations around the world, and all of these events present significant challenges to both security and business continuity teams. At the same time, workforces are more dispersed and mobile than ever, creating increasing challenges in a world where instant communication is expected regardless of circumstances. Integrating these two solutions — actionable risk alerting and assessment with instant, bi-directional communication — is the next horizon in real-time risk management. 

Monitor and respond to security threats

IDV Solutions’ Visual Command Center provides security operations teams with a single, integrated picture of their asset locations and risk events that may threaten those assets, such as acts of terrorism, severe weather, civil unrest, and hazardous materials releases. It consolidates this risk information with data from other sources, including an organization’s internal systems, like asset locations, floor plans, and physical security systems, on an interactive map and timeline.

Dell AlertFind Enterprise Notification is a cloud-based service that provides communications with employees in the event of an emergency.  It is scalable to the needs of the largest organizations and delivers critical communications via email, landline, mobile phone, and SMS text, with the ability to collect and organize responses. Enterprise-class capabilities include automated escalations; integrated IVR; automatic conference call bridging; geographic-based notifications; text-to-speech conversion in 14 languages; integrated incident collaboration center; and more. With the new integration, when Visual Command Center detects a potential threat near an asset or employee location, AlertFind sends notifications to crisis response teams and affected employees. Notification responses and employee status information from AlertFind are instantly visible in Visual Command Center, and organizations can quickly assess and take action to eliminate or mitigate risk.

Availability:

Dell AlertFind and IDV Solutions’ Visual Command Center product integration is available now.  More information can be found at: http://software.dell.com/documents/alertfind-idv-visual-command-center-connection-datasheet-30142.pdf

Supporting Quotes:

Jonathan Wolf, director, product management, Dell Software

“Dell is committed to helping organizations maintain business continuity during emergencies, even when communications infrastructure may be impacted. Integration with a risk monitoring platform is a natural extension of the value Dell AlertFind brings to the entire risk management process. We’re excited about the Dell AlertFind and IDV Solutions Visual Command Center integration. Not only do we use this integrated solution internally at Dell, but many of our customers – particularly Global 500 organizations – use or are evaluating Visual Command Center.”

Mark Morrison, CEO, IDV Solutions

“Dell has been a great customer, providing valuable feedback for extending and improving our products.  We are excited to partner with their technology team to deliver enhanced capabilities that extend the power of Visual Command Center.  The integration with Dell AlertFind helps organizations act quickly to mitigate or eliminate the impact of risk to their people, assets and operations.”

Delivering Complete and Connected Software Solutions

Dell Software empowers companies of all sizes to experience Dell’s “Power to Do More” by delivering scalable yet simple-to-use solutions that can increase productivity, responsiveness and efficiency. Dell Software is uniquely positioned to address today’s most pressing business and IT challenges with holistic, connected software offerings across five core solution areas, encompassing data center and cloud management, information management, mobile workforce management, security and data protection. This software, when combined with Dell hardware and services, helps customers simplify IT, mitigate risk and accelerate business results.

About Dell

Dell Inc. listens to customers and delivers innovative technology and services that give them the power to do more. For more information, visit www.dell.com.

About IDV Solutions

IDV Solutions® is the global leader in delivering Enterprise Risk Visualization capabilities through software and services that enable organizations to protect their assets, ensure continuity of operations and optimize performance.  Its Visual Command Center software is used in organizational functions such as security, field services, supply chain, and operations to mitigate or eliminate the impact of risk.  By helping organizations in the Global 2000 and government manage risk through visualization, IDV and its products have earned a reputation for innovation, speed, and the highest quality user experience.

Dell World

Join us November 4-6 at Dell World 2014, Dell’s premier customer event exploring how technology solutions and services provide organizations a better way to accelerate business’ ability to innovate. Learn more at www.dellworld.com and follow #DellWorld on Twitter.

Tweet This: @DellSoftware and @IDVSolutions team to conquer next horizon in risk awareness and instant emergency communications 

How to Keep Your Resume Sharp

Updating your resume should be an annual event. Sprucing up your resume helps you stay current by keeping all your big career accomplishments fresh in your mind. Even if you’re not on the job market right now, updating your resume comes in handy for annual reviews and salary re-assessments.

It helps tremendously to look at examples of other people’s resumes before updating your own. When looking at other people’s resumes, you’ll form opinions very quickly about what works and what doesn’t for your experience, your personal taste, and your job field. It’s ideal to see resumes from applicants who are in the same job field as you are, but if you don’t have access to any, you should still look at something.

Plenty of websites have generic sample resumes to peruse, but if you know of a job search website in your field that allows users to upload their resumes, poke around. See what you can find.

Bear in Mind That They Only Glance
When you’re learning from other people’s resumes, look at each for just a few seconds, and then look away. One study from The Ladder showed recruiters spent just six seconds evaluating resumes before deciding to put them in the “keep” or “reject” pile.

Because recruiters and hiring managers barely even glance at resumes, the trick in drafting a resume is to figure out what counts, and spend your time wisely making those parts shine. But how do you do that?

Whatever Counts, Make it Pop
Try to get into the mind of the recruiter or HR manager who might look at your resume. Ask yourself:
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  • What’s most impressive on your resume for your field and personal experience: names of organizations where you worked, job title, length of time at job, job title progression?
  • What else catches my eye if I look for six seconds? Often, the answer is numbers purely because of how they stand out from alphabetic text, e.g., “I managed a $2 million account,” or “Website traffic grew 55 percent under my leadership.”
  • Why or how does my resume look different from those of my competitors? Hiring managers often look at a stack of resumes and select a few candidates from that pool. In other words, you’re not competing with everyone in the world—just the people in that pool. What can you do that’s still tasteful to make your resume look better than the ones around it?

When you figure out what needs to pop, go back to those other resume samples you reviewed and look again at what stands out and why. Is it because of a different font, or the use of boldface, or ALL CAPS? Or maybe something stands out because of

intentional, excessive white space.

Think about what doesn’t work as well. Personally, I would never use more than two fonts on a resume. And I’m not a designer, so I don’t mess around with color. Know your limitations. If you have an absolutely wretched eye for formatting and design, use a resume template, and do not veer from it.

Make a Base Resume, Once a Year
There is no such thing as having only one resume, but there is such a thing as having a base resume. The base resume is the one you’ll riff on to create variations you can actually submit to job openings.

If you use the handy year-folder organization method, you can save your annually updated base resume in the year folder, perhaps named something like 2014_Duffy_Resume. That way, you’ll always know, more or less, how current the resume is and whether you’ve updated it for the current year.

Update the resume to reflect not only new information about your and your career highlights, but also anything that might make the resume look dated if left unchanged. Change your fonts and formatting if necessary to look fresh. Remove or alter any language that might subject you to ageism, racism, or sexism. Basically, edit it based on best practices (there may be new ones this year), what you learned from looking at other people’s resumes, and to keep the information relevant and up-to-date.

That base resume could take you days to put together. And it should be spotless. Having an absolutely clean resume that you’ve gone over with a fine-tooth comb many times makes it easier and quicker to create clean variations on it. Have at least one friend, colleague, or professional resume writer review it, too. Your eyeballs shouldn’t be the only ones to have seen it.

Create Variations
It shouldn’t take a lot of time to create a variation, which I’m going to call a tailored resume. The trick is to reorder a few items, customize some of the language for the job at hand, and cut irrelevant stuff.

Let’s say you’re applying to a job, and in the description, there’s a strong emphasis on financial experience. Perhaps you have a bullet point or two under your most recent experience about dealing with accounting matters. Gussy those points up, and move them to the top. Eyeball that section to see whether those two points pop, and, if they don’t, consider what you can do to make them stand out more.

That kind of tailoring makes a difference and doesn’t take more than a few minutes.

You should create a tailored resume for every job application. Even if the core details remain the same, it’s incredibly important to match the language and highlights on your resume to the job at hand. Don’t lie, but do put the most relevant stuff in front of the hiring manager’s face.

Cut, Cut, Cut
Again, based on the field in which you work, your personal experience, and the job at hand, you’ll want to leave out details that don’t matter.

If you’re applying for a job as a programmer, and your first job was as an administrative assistant, but since then you’ve have three other programming jobs with extensive experience, you don’t need to mention the admin job. Not at all! You can leave it off entirely. If the experience wasn’t relevant to the job at hand, no one cares that you did it.

Sometimes people want to include every single job they’ve ever held since graduating college so as to show continuity, or that they’ve had a job continuously since university. The workaround is to simply not include the year you graduated on your resume. In all likelihood, it’s not relevant. Plus, your graduation year is an easy way for someone to guess your age and discriminate against you based on that.

If something on your resume isn’t relevant to the job at hand, leave it out.

There are some exceptions, but they are specific to certain kinds of careers (government jobs come to mind). In many fields, a one-page resume showing only your highlights is more than fine—it’s preferred.

Hold!
When you have that resume exactly as you want it and are ready to submit it, hold it for a day. This is advice I have had to learn over the years, as I’m impatient and like to check tasks off my to-do list immediately rather than wait.

If you wait, however, you can review the resume with fresh eyes before you send it in.

Unless the job application has a looming deadline, taking an extra 24 hours or even six hours to apply will not change your chances of you getting the job in the slightest. And if it lets you catch a typo or inconsistency on your resume that you might have otherwise missed, waiting probably helps your chances.


Get Organized is a weekly series of articles on PCMag.com to help you keep your digital files and online life organized. Check back every Monday for new tips. For more from Jill Duffy, follow her on Twitter @jilleduffy. And check out the Get Organized book:

“Get Organized: How to Clean Up Your Messy Digital Life” by Jill Duffy on Ganxy

Dell and IDV Solutions Team to Deliver Enterprise-Class Global Risk Visualization with Integrated Communications to Help Organizations Take Action and Mitigate Risk

  • Cloud-based solution enables organizations to visualize, assess and mitigate risks to people and assets, anywhere and anytime
  • Integration of Dell AlertFind Enterprise Notification service with Visual Command Center enterprise risk visualization solution from IDV Solutions, maintains business continuity with 24/7 proactive monitoring and global alerting

Dell Software today announced the integration of its cloud-based AlertFind Enterprise Notification service with leading enterprise risk visualization solution Visual Command Center, from IDV Solutions.  With this integration, organizations using Visual Command Center to monitor global risk events – including severe weather, political unrest, or natural disasters –  that could threaten people and facilities around the world now can instantly communicate and get critical information to affected employees via the AlertFind emergency mass notification service. 

Organizations concerned about risk management have many threats to consider. Natural disasters – hurricanes, earthquakes, fires, tsunamis – seem to be occurring across the globe with increasing frequency. The growing global risk from terrorism also poses threats to the people and assets of organizations around the world, and all of these events present significant challenges to both security and business continuity teams. At the same time, workforces are more dispersed and mobile than ever, creating increasing challenges in a world where instant communication is expected regardless of circumstances. Integrating these two solutions — actionable risk alerting and assessment with instant, bi-directional communication — is the next horizon in real-time risk management. 

Monitor and respond to security threats

IDV Solutions’ Visual Command Center provides security operations teams with a single, integrated picture of their asset locations and risk events that may threaten those assets, such as acts of terrorism, severe weather, civil unrest, and hazardous materials releases. It consolidates this risk information with data from other sources, including an organization’s internal systems, like asset locations, floor plans, and physical security systems, on an interactive map and timeline.

Dell AlertFind Enterprise Notification is a cloud-based service that provides communications with employees in the event of an emergency.  It is scalable to the needs of the largest organizations and delivers critical communications via email, landline, mobile phone, and SMS text, with the ability to collect and organize responses. Enterprise-class capabilities include automated escalations; integrated IVR; automatic conference call bridging; geographic-based notifications; text-to-speech conversion in 14 languages; integrated incident collaboration center; and more. With the new integration, when Visual Command Center detects a potential threat near an asset or employee location, AlertFind sends notifications to crisis response teams and affected employees. Notification responses and employee status information from AlertFind are instantly visible in Visual Command Center, and organizations can quickly assess and take action to eliminate or mitigate risk.

Availability:

Dell AlertFind and IDV Solutions’ Visual Command Center product integration is available now.  More information can be found at: http://software.dell.com/documents/alertfind-idv-visual-command-center-connection-datasheet-30142.pdf

Supporting Quotes:

Jonathan Wolf, director, product management, Dell Software

“Dell is committed to helping organizations maintain business continuity during emergencies, even when communications infrastructure may be impacted. Integration with a risk monitoring platform is a natural extension of the value Dell AlertFind brings to the entire risk management process. We’re excited about the Dell AlertFind and IDV Solutions Visual Command Center integration. Not only do we use this integrated solution internally at Dell, but many of our customers – particularly Global 500 organizations – use or are evaluating Visual Command Center.”

Mark Morrison, CEO, IDV Solutions

“Dell has been a great customer, providing valuable feedback for extending and improving our products.  We are excited to partner with their technology team to deliver enhanced capabilities that extend the power of Visual Command Center.  The integration with Dell AlertFind helps organizations act quickly to mitigate or eliminate the impact of risk to their people, assets and operations.”

Delivering Complete and Connected Software Solutions

Dell Software empowers companies of all sizes to experience Dell’s “Power to Do More” by delivering scalable yet simple-to-use solutions that can increase productivity, responsiveness and efficiency. Dell Software is uniquely positioned to address today’s most pressing business and IT challenges with holistic, connected software offerings across five core solution areas, encompassing data center and cloud management, information management, mobile workforce management, security and data protection. This software, when combined with Dell hardware and services, helps customers simplify IT, mitigate risk and accelerate business results.

About Dell

Dell Inc. listens to customers and delivers innovative technology and services that give them the power to do more. For more information, visit www.dell.com.

About IDV Solutions

IDV Solutions® is the global leader in delivering Enterprise Risk Visualization capabilities through software and services that enable organizations to protect their assets, ensure continuity of operations and optimize performance.  Its Visual Command Center software is used in organizational functions such as security, field services, supply chain, and operations to mitigate or eliminate the impact of risk.  By helping organizations in the Global 2000 and government manage risk through visualization, IDV and its products have earned a reputation for innovation, speed, and the highest quality user experience.

Dell World

Join us November 4-6 at Dell World 2014, Dell’s premier customer event exploring how technology solutions and services provide organizations a better way to accelerate business’ ability to innovate. Learn more at www.dellworld.com and follow #DellWorld on Twitter.

Tweet This: @DellSoftware and @IDVSolutions team to conquer next horizon in risk awareness and instant emergency communications 

How to Keep Your Resume Sharp

Updating your resume should be an annual event. Sprucing up your resume helps you stay current by keeping all your big career accomplishments fresh in your mind. Even if you’re not on the job market right now, updating your resume comes in handy for annual reviews and salary re-assessments.

It helps tremendously to look at examples of other people’s resumes before updating your own. When looking at other people’s resumes, you’ll form opinions very quickly about what works and what doesn’t for your experience, your personal taste, and your job field. It’s ideal to see resumes from applicants who are in the same job field as you are, but if you don’t have access to any, you should still look at something.

Plenty of websites have generic sample resumes to peruse, but if you know of a job search website in your field that allows users to upload their resumes, poke around. See what you can find.

Bear in Mind That They Only Glance
When you’re learning from other people’s resumes, look at each for just a few seconds, and then look away. One study from The Ladder showed recruiters spent just six seconds evaluating resumes before deciding to put them in the “keep” or “reject” pile.

Because recruiters and hiring managers barely even glance at resumes, the trick in drafting a resume is to figure out what counts, and spend your time wisely making those parts shine. But how do you do that?

Whatever Counts, Make it Pop
Try to get into the mind of the recruiter or HR manager who might look at your resume. Ask yourself:
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ul.article_ul li {margin-left:30px!important; padding:0px 15px 5px 1px!important;}

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  • What’s most impressive on your resume for your field and personal experience: names of organizations where you worked, job title, length of time at job, job title progression?
  • What else catches my eye if I look for six seconds? Often, the answer is numbers purely because of how they stand out from alphabetic text, e.g., “I managed a $2 million account,” or “Website traffic grew 55 percent under my leadership.”
  • Why or how does my resume look different from those of my competitors? Hiring managers often look at a stack of resumes and select a few candidates from that pool. In other words, you’re not competing with everyone in the world—just the people in that pool. What can you do that’s still tasteful to make your resume look better than the ones around it?

When you figure out what needs to pop, go back to those other resume samples you reviewed and look again at what stands out and why. Is it because of a different font, or the use of boldface, or ALL CAPS? Or maybe something stands out because of

intentional, excessive white space.

Think about what doesn’t work as well. Personally, I would never use more than two fonts on a resume. And I’m not a designer, so I don’t mess around with color. Know your limitations. If you have an absolutely wretched eye for formatting and design, use a resume template, and do not veer from it.

Make a Base Resume, Once a Year
There is no such thing as having only one resume, but there is such a thing as having a base resume. The base resume is the one you’ll riff on to create variations you can actually submit to job openings.

If you use the handy year-folder organization method, you can save your annually updated base resume in the year folder, perhaps named something like 2014_Duffy_Resume. That way, you’ll always know, more or less, how current the resume is and whether you’ve updated it for the current year.

Update the resume to reflect not only new information about your and your career highlights, but also anything that might make the resume look dated if left unchanged. Change your fonts and formatting if necessary to look fresh. Remove or alter any language that might subject you to ageism, racism, or sexism. Basically, edit it based on best practices (there may be new ones this year), what you learned from looking at other people’s resumes, and to keep the information relevant and up-to-date.

That base resume could take you days to put together. And it should be spotless. Having an absolutely clean resume that you’ve gone over with a fine-tooth comb many times makes it easier and quicker to create clean variations on it. Have at least one friend, colleague, or professional resume writer review it, too. Your eyeballs shouldn’t be the only ones to have seen it.

Create Variations
It shouldn’t take a lot of time to create a variation, which I’m going to call a tailored resume. The trick is to reorder a few items, customize some of the language for the job at hand, and cut irrelevant stuff.

Let’s say you’re applying to a job, and in the description, there’s a strong emphasis on financial experience. Perhaps you have a bullet point or two under your most recent experience about dealing with accounting matters. Gussy those points up, and move them to the top. Eyeball that section to see whether those two points pop, and, if they don’t, consider what you can do to make them stand out more.

That kind of tailoring makes a difference and doesn’t take more than a few minutes.

You should create a tailored resume for every job application. Even if the core details remain the same, it’s incredibly important to match the language and highlights on your resume to the job at hand. Don’t lie, but do put the most relevant stuff in front of the hiring manager’s face.

Cut, Cut, Cut
Again, based on the field in which you work, your personal experience, and the job at hand, you’ll want to leave out details that don’t matter.

If you’re applying for a job as a programmer, and your first job was as an administrative assistant, but since then you’ve have three other programming jobs with extensive experience, you don’t need to mention the admin job. Not at all! You can leave it off entirely. If the experience wasn’t relevant to the job at hand, no one cares that you did it.

Sometimes people want to include every single job they’ve ever held since graduating college so as to show continuity, or that they’ve had a job continuously since university. The workaround is to simply not include the year you graduated on your resume. In all likelihood, it’s not relevant. Plus, your graduation year is an easy way for someone to guess your age and discriminate against you based on that.

If something on your resume isn’t relevant to the job at hand, leave it out.

There are some exceptions, but they are specific to certain kinds of careers (government jobs come to mind). In many fields, a one-page resume showing only your highlights is more than fine—it’s preferred.

Hold!
When you have that resume exactly as you want it and are ready to submit it, hold it for a day. This is advice I have had to learn over the years, as I’m impatient and like to check tasks off my to-do list immediately rather than wait.

If you wait, however, you can review the resume with fresh eyes before you send it in.

Unless the job application has a looming deadline, taking an extra 24 hours or even six hours to apply will not change your chances of you getting the job in the slightest. And if it lets you catch a typo or inconsistency on your resume that you might have otherwise missed, waiting probably helps your chances.


Get Organized is a weekly series of articles on PCMag.com to help you keep your digital files and online life organized. Check back every Monday for new tips. For more from Jill Duffy, follow her on Twitter @jilleduffy. And check out the Get Organized book:

“Get Organized: How to Clean Up Your Messy Digital Life” by Jill Duffy on Ganxy

Cloudera Names Dell Services a Systems Integrator Partner

  • Dell and Cloudera Deliver End-to-End Solutions for Customers’ Big Data Needs


Dell Services
and Cloudera, a leader in enterprise analytic data management powered by Apache Hadoop™, today announced that Dell Services has been named a Cloudera systems integrator partner for Hadoop implementations. This expands upon the existing relationship that Cloudera has with the Dell Enterprise Solutions Group to provide reference architectures and standard configurations for the Cloudera enterprise suite . By joining the Cloudera systems integrator program, Dell, already a recognized leader in big data, is now able to help customers implement Cloudera enterprise solutions based on their specific workloads, along with end-to-end solutions that can include hardware, software and services.

Organizations across multiple vertical markets are actively using big data to enhance customer experience, improve processes and reduce costs . Gartner points out that 55 percent of organizations surveyed are implementing big data to enhance customer experience, 49 percent are using it to improve process efficiency, and 42 percent for new products and business models. However, analyzing big data content is one of the biggest challenges organizations face today, since they must manage increasing amounts of raw data from diverse sources such as sensors, machines, social media, server logs and many more.

As a Cloudera systems integrator partner, Dell Services can deliver a complete Apache Hadoop solution, ranging from architectural design to data integration, analytics development, implementation and support. Dell now offers a variety of industry-focused joint solutions including Cloudera Enterprise-based services, including:

  • Enterprise Data Hub for Cloudera Enterprise – Implementation of an enterprise data hub to support downstream applications and analytics
  • Online Archiving with Cloudera Enterprise – Provides an archiving solution for enterprise data warehouses (EDWs) using Hadoop to avoid expensive upgrades and improve data warehouse performance
  • Capacity Buyback with Cloudera Enterprise – Improves data and report availability by offloading processes that consume significant amounts of EDW platform resources
  • Managed Services for Cloudera Enterprise – Application Management, Incident Management, and Big Data / Hadoop support for new and existing Hadoop environments
  • Engineering Intelligence Analytics with Cloudera Enterprise – Integrates sensor/machine data to allow for proactive predictive failure analysis, improve maintenance scheduling, and ensure real-time insights into performance of entire machine ecosystem

 

“The extension of our strategic alliance with Dell to include expert services will now help Dell build a comprehensive open source Hadoop portfolio to develop more wide-ranging solutions for enterprises,” said Tim Stevens, vice president, Business and Corporate Development, Cloudera. “ We can now work as an extended team with Dell to help its customers compete in an increasingly digital, data-driven environment.”

In joining the Cloudera systems integrator program, a team of Dell consultants completed a rigorous Cloudera training curriculum that included individual certification, followed by the shadowing of the Cloudera professional services team to demonstrate capability and skill.

“Dell is a recognized leader for analytics, both as a practitioner as well as a service provider for our customers across different industries. The rise of unstructured data has provided a unique opportunity to gather more precise customer insights and discover patterns to detect fraud and anomalies in the high velocity world of data amongst others. Our strategic alliance with Cloudera will enable us to help our customers across industries succeed in a digital era and make them better positioned to serve their customers, mitigate risks and increase productivity,” said Raman Sapra, global head of Digital Business Services, Dell.

The work with Cloudera further strengthens Dell’s Digital Business Services portfolio, which helps customers embrace digital through analytics analytics, mobile, social media and cloud technologies to improve customer engagement.

This certification builds on a long-standing relationship between Dell and Cloudera and is in addition to the Dell™ Apache™ Hadoop® Solutions that provide super-fast analysis, data mining and processing capabilities . Dell has tracked 30 billion security events analyzed every day using Dell Hadoop solutions and Dell and Cloudera also recently announced Dell In-Memory Appliances for Cloudera Enterprise aimed at accelerating Hadoop deployments. The Dell – Cloudera Apache Hadoop Solution, accelerated by Intel, was jointly designed by Dell and Cloudera, and embodies all the hardware, software, resources and services needed to run Hadoop in a production environment in order to reduce production time.

At Hadoop World on Oct. 15-17, 2014, Cloudera and Dell will present a panel discussion called, “ Important Advances in Hadoop” (Thursday, October 16 at 5:15pm; Room 1D03/D04). Attendees can also stop by the Dell Services booth (booth #102) to learn more.

Dell World
Join us November 4-6 at Dell World 2014, Dell’s premier customer event exploring how technology solutions and services provide organizations a better way to accelerate business’ ability to innovate . Learn more at www.dellworld.com and follow #DellWorld on Twitter.

About Dell
Dell Inc. listens to customers and delivers innovative technology and services that give them the power to do more. Dell Services develops and delivers a comprehensive suite of services and solutions in applications, business process, consulting, infrastructure and support to help customers succeed.

Dell is a trademark of Dell Inc. Dell disclaims any proprietary interest in the marks and names of others.

About Cloudera
Cloudera is revolutionizing enterprise data management by offering the first unified Platform for Big Data, an enterprise data hub built on Apache Hadoop. Cloudera offers enterprises one place to store, access, process, secure, and analyze all their data, empowering them to extend the value of existing investments while enabling fundamental new ways to derive value from their data. Cloudera’s open source Big Data platform is the most widely adopted in the world, and Cloudera is the most prolific contributor to the open source Hadoop ecosystem. As the leading educator of Hadoop professionals, Cloudera has trained over 22,000 individuals worldwide. Over 1,000 partners and a seasoned professional services team help deliver greater time to value. Finally, only Cloudera provides proactive and predictive support to run an enterprise data hub with confidence. Leading organizations in every industry plus top public sector organizations globally run Cloudera in production.

Read our blog: http://www.cloudera.com/blog/, follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/cloudera, join the Cloudera Community http://cloudera.com/community, and visit us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/cloudera

Cloudera, Cloudera Platform for Big Data, Cloudera Enterprise Basic Edition, Cloudera Enterprise Flex Edition, Cloudera Enterprise Data Hub Edition and CDH are trademarks or registered trademarks of Cloudera in the United States and in jurisdictions throughout the world. All other company and product names may be trade names or trademarks of their respective owners.

Apple Watch Is the Next BYOD Headache for Business

The Apple Watch is causing excitement for some and a lot of scoffing about much ado about nothing from others. Despite anyone’s take on how revolutionary the technology is or isn’t, there is one thing that is very clear—the Apple Watch stands to introduce new Mobile Device Management (MDM) considerations for businesses.

Since the advent of BYOD (bring your own device), I really have yet to see a comprehensive MDM platform that completely gives IT the tools it needs to keep corporate data safe from data leakage and malware while simultaneously freeing device owners to do their work on devices of choice. You either have free to low-cost tools that let you do basic tasks such as remote wipe, or you have these proprietary, complex platforms that require a business to standardize the devices and apps allowed on the corporate network. You know, the complete opposite intent of BYOD. MDM remains a precarious balancing act between security and user appeasement, and I guarantee that with the announcement of Apple’s wearable, MDM is going to get more challenging.

Apple Addresses Mobile Security Concerns…Finally

In all fairness, it’s not as if Apple has been completely blasé about mobile security. In fact, Cupertino seems finally to be concerned with the security risks its wildly coveted devices may bring to a business network—and yes, I state this even after the iCloud nudie pics blowout.

Consider the announcements made about iOS 8 at this year’s WWDC. For the first time, Apple was actually very embracing of third-party partnerships, including a venture with IBM called IBM MobileFirst for iOS that encompasses enterprise apps and mobile device management over Apple devices on business networks. Henning Volkmer, the president and CEO of Cortado, an enterprise MDM solutions company, said that the most interesting change about Apple of late, is how it’s becoming “very inclusive.”

OpinionsOn the surface, from what Apple revealed at its event this week, the Apple Watch does not seem to pose much of a security threat if an employee sports one in the office. The watch needs a connection to an iPhone. It has no native 3G/4G or Wi-Fi connectivity—it just pairs with an iPhone via Bluetooth. However, Bluetooth is subject to its own security vulnerabilities and the fact that data is syncing between the iPhone and iWatch; such as messages; means there may be new threat risks for business networks to consider.

No Hard Info on Apple Watch Network Security
Yet, Tim Cook provided no information about security, data storage, or details on the syncing capabilities between the watch and an iPhone during his introduction of the smartwatch. Presumably, one should not see any data on the watch if a paired iPhone is out of range. But what if there are sensitive business messages cached in some manner?








Jim Haviland, CSO of Vox Mobile, an enterprise mobility solutions provider, also expressed data concerns. “The place where I would be most concerned is in having the ability to know what data any app on the Watch is collecting and what it is doing with it. We have this problem now with all smart devices but you need to go to third party tools like Appthority to even begin to understand those threats. Some enterprise organizations will want to be able to control which sensors are active based on the device’s location or time-of-day and MDM would be the best tool for managing that,” Haviland said.

And then there are the risks that Bluetooth brings. Bluetooth has been compromised before. Kaspersky has a detailed blog post about the vulnerabilities of the protocol, including a hack that would allow an attacker to take control of a user’s phone via Bluetooth. Then there are, of course, security issues involving NFC, which is also being incorporated into the Apple Watch.

Of course, we have had smartwatches on the market for some time now, like the Samsung’s Galaxy Gear and its Tizen-based successors. Yet, the wearable form factor has not really crossed into the enterprise space. The consensus in the industry is that business adoption is imminent.

Apple review, Apple commentary, Apple news... Everything Apple“We have heard plenty of talk amongst enterprise clients that they want to include wearables, in general, into their solution designs,” said Haviland. “A hands-free interface and health information can be very valuable when you are trying to support people in dangerous or physically challenging situations so the future demand is there.”

If one wearable stands to speed up enterprise adoption, it will be the Apple Watch in the same way Apple made the tablet ubiquitous in the enterprise with the iPad.

Start Planning Now
That means business IT needs to think seriously about how the Apple Watch and other wearables fit into an existing MDM strategy. Think, but not panic. “As long as the iPhone is secure I don’t really see the watch posing a big problem,” for security, said Volkmer.

Foreseeably, businesses that already have MDM in place for the personal mobile devices employees connect to the corporate network have a head start on being prepared for the inevitable deluge of Apple Watches in the workplace. As for others, the launch of a wearable device from Apple next year should get them started on plans and policies on how to manage this device on the business network.

Dell Software Extends its Secure Mobile Workspace to Help Customers Accelerate Move to BYOD

  • Unique business phone feature of Dell Enterprise Mobility Management (EMM) provides voice, texts and work-related communications on employee-owned mobile devices
  • Mobile cloud offering delivers a single application for enabling secure access to enterprise phone, email and storage apps, while ensuring privacy on employee-owned mobile devices
  • Dell extends suite of pre-integrated apps and services to streamline mobile/BYOD enablement

Dell today unveiled its latest mobility/BYOD innovation for Dell Enterprise Mobility Management (EMM) with enhancements to its Dell Mobile Workspace, a complete, cloud-based solution that ensures simplified, secure access to enterprise phone, email and storage services from an employee’s personal Android or iOS smartphone or tablet. This mobile cloud software solution helps streamline mobile/BYOD enablement with the availability of Dell Business Phone powered by Vonage Business Solutions™, email integration with Microsoft Office 365 and access to Box™ for Dell to support enterprise content collaboration.

These new Dell Mobile Workspace capabilities extend the secure, managed enterprise workspace and enable apps and services to share data securely and synchronize enterprise information seamlessly. With Dell Business Phone, employees gain the flexibility and privacy of having a separate business line and phone number on their existing Android or iOS smartphone or tablet using Dell Mobile Workspace. This unique voice feature also gives enterprises the ability to set security and calling policies, as well as route calls over WiFi, cellular voice and data networks to help control telecom expenses.

According to Gartner, half of the enterprises surveyed in the firm’s primary research studies intend to move to all BYOD for smartphones in 2017, creating new opportunities and challenges for business and IT leaders.[1] Gartner also reports that mobile telecom spending will jump 16 percent from 2013 to 2016, putting more pressure on enterprise IT budgets. Frequently changing, complex cellular pricing and service plans make it difficult for enterprise mobility and procurement managers to select their most economical options.[2] Moreover, the recent ruling from a California appeals court, which will require employers in the state to reimburse employees for work-related calls, could create a legislative snowball as other states consider the costs and implications associated with BYOD.

“With Dell Business Phone, Dell provides a compelling end-to-end user experience while removing some of the biggest BYOD security, manageability and cost hurdles companies face,” said Neal Foster, executive director of mobility solutions for Dell Software. “We will continue to curate and pre-integrate productivity apps and services into Dell’s EMM heterogeneous mobile cloud offering to ensure our customers have what they need to keep pace with the rapid adoption of BYOD and mobility.”

Boost Employee Productivity with Dell Business Phone, Box for Dell and Microsoft Office 365 Integration
Dell Business Phone provides employees with the features they need for work-related calls, texts, voicemails, conference calls, three-way calls, and call recording. This latest addition to Dell’s EMM solution leverages a proven, reliable and scalable, cloud-based communications platform from Vonage Business Solutions.

“Vonage is pleased to partner with Dell Software to help companies save time, money and valuable resources by transitioning from traditional telecom services to highly-flexible, feature rich Internet-based communications,” said Wain Kellum, president of Vonage Business Solutions, a subsidiary of Vonage Holdings Corp. “With Dell Business Phone powered by Vonage Business Solutions, we’re enabling increased employee mobility, flexibility and productivity through the use of their own devices for all forms of business communications.”

Dell Business Phone can be added easily to Dell’s EMM environment, which simplifies IT workflow by providing a single location from which IT administrators can oversee the management and policy of the company’s entire EMM footprint. From the portal, IT can secure user identity and device connectivity as well as integrate and deploy Dell Business Phone and other productivity applications. With Box for Dell, employees can access enterprise files and folders securely across a range of devices and workspaces to share documents, collaborate among teams and edit content directly with existing applications. Additionally, Dell EMM integrates seamlessly with Microsoft Office 365 to offer cloud-based, hosted business-class email and shared calendars to elevate mobile employee productivity anywhere, anytime.

Elevate Enterprise Security with Enterprise-Managed Dell EMM Apps and Services
With the enterprise-managed Dell Business Phone service, IT can safeguard call logs, voicemail, texts, contacts and other data within the encrypted Dell Mobile Workspace. The ability to retain access to business phone data, as well as billing records, helps ensure compliance with regulatory and legal requirements.

Additionally, Dell EMM builds identity and access management (IAM) capabilities into its Dell Mobile Workspace, which enables administrators to control access to enterprise resources while simplifying how employees access mobile devices using a single sign-on process. If an employee leaves the company or their personal device is lost or stolen, administrators can wipe enterprise data from the mobile device to mitigate security risks.

Reduce Costs with Simplified Deployments and Fewer Wireless Service Fees
The carrier-agnostic Dell Business Phone service helps organizations make their telecom budgets go further by removing the need to purchase corporate-owned smartphones, as well as services tied to specific wireless carriers. Additional savings can be realized by reducing wireless service costs through the ability to deploy shared-minute plans and pool employees’ minutes-of-use (MOUs). Also, the ability to have one bill for all employees streamlines administration of wireless service plans and decreases the need for expense vouchers to subsidize work-related BYOD calls.

VoIP calling over WiFi is another major cost saver as this removes long-distance and international roaming charges. Additionally, WiFi can help solve indoor cellular coverage issues while reducing the need to use cellular voice minutes and expensive cellular mobile data when employees are working from home offices, corporate offices or locations with WiFi hot spots. In fact, IT administrators can set or restrict the methods in which calls are placed (WiFi, cellular voice, cellular data) to enable further cost savings.

With Dell EMM, customers can benefit from secure, integrated solutions priced at monthly/yearly subscriptions that enable organizations to scale their BYOD programs cost effectively, buying only what they need for current needs while growing in place as their requirements expand.

Pricing and Availability
Dell’s new Mobile Workspace capabilities will be available in October 2014. For Dell EMM customers, Dell Business Phone powered by Vonage Business Solutions will be offered as four flexible, prepackaged plans, starting at $19.99 per month for up to 1,000 voice minutes and unlimited text. There is no activation fee.

Dell Mobile/BYOD Solutions
Dell’s extensive portfolio of mobility solutions includes tablets, laptops desktops, wireless networking, secure remote access, next-gen firewalls, IAM, EMM and services. Together, mobility solutions from Dell span from the device to the data center to drive end-user productivity and improve business processes without sacrificing compliance.

Dell Enterprise Mobility Management is an end-to-end mobile/BYOD enablement solution that blends the company’s industry-leading secure remote access from Dell SonicWALL, encryption from Dell Data Protection | Encryption, mobile device management from Dell Wyse, systems management from Dell KACE, access control from Dell One Identity solutions, and new, application-based secure workspaces to reduce cost, complexity and risk.

Dell World
Join us Nov. 4-6 at Dell World 2014, Dell’s premier customer event exploring how technology solutions and services provide organizations a better way to accelerate business’ ability to innovate. Learn more at www.dellworld.com and follow #DellWorld on Twitter.

About Dell
Dell Inc. listens to customers and delivers innovative technology and services that give them the power to do more. For more information, visit www,dell.com.

Tweet this: Ease the move to #BYOD with new business phone service. #Dell Business Phone gives you #mobile security, control and voice/text.

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[1] Gartner, “Bring Your Own Device: The Results and the Future,” David A. Willis, May 2014.
[2] Gartner, “Focus on Four Areas to Control U.S. Cellular Voice and Data Services Costs,” Bill Menezes, January 2014.

Apple Watch Is the Next BYOD Headache for Business

The Apple Watch is causing excitement for some and a lot of scoffing about much ado about nothing from others. Despite anyone’s take on how revolutionary the technology is or isn’t, there is one thing that is very clear—the Apple Watch stands to introduce new Mobile Device Management (MDM) considerations for businesses.

Since the advent of BYOD (bring your own device), I really have yet to see a comprehensive MDM platform that completely gives IT the tools it needs to keep corporate data safe from data leakage and malware while simultaneously freeing device owners to do their work on devices of choice. You either have free to low-cost tools that let you do basic tasks such as remote wipe, or you have these proprietary, complex platforms that require a business to standardize the devices and apps allowed on the corporate network. You know, the complete opposite intent of BYOD. MDM remains a precarious balancing act between security and user appeasement, and I guarantee that with the announcement of Apple’s wearable, MDM is going to get more challenging.

Apple Addresses Mobile Security Concerns…Finally

In all fairness, it’s not as if Apple has been completely blasé about mobile security. In fact, Cupertino seems finally to be concerned with the security risks its wildly coveted devices may bring to a business network—and yes, I state this even after the iCloud nudie pics blowout.

Consider the announcements made about iOS 8 at this year’s WWDC. For the first time, Apple was actually very embracing of third-party partnerships, including a venture with IBM called IBM MobileFirst for iOS that encompasses enterprise apps and mobile device management over Apple devices on business networks. Henning Volkmer, the president and CEO of Cortado, an enterprise MDM solutions company, said that the most interesting change about Apple of late, is how it’s becoming “very inclusive.”

OpinionsOn the surface, from what Apple revealed at its event this week, the Apple Watch does not seem to pose much of a security threat if an employee sports one in the office. The watch needs a connection to an iPhone. It has no native 3G/4G or Wi-Fi connectivity—it just pairs with an iPhone via Bluetooth. However, Bluetooth is subject to its own security vulnerabilities and the fact that data is syncing between the iPhone and iWatch; such as messages; means there may be new threat risks for business networks to consider.

No Hard Info on Apple Watch Network Security
Yet, Tim Cook provided no information about security, data storage, or details on the syncing capabilities between the watch and an iPhone during his introduction of the smartwatch. Presumably, one should not see any data on the watch if a paired iPhone is out of range. But what if there are sensitive business messages cached in some manner?








Jim Haviland, CSO of Vox Mobile, an enterprise mobility solutions provider, also expressed data concerns. “The place where I would be most concerned is in having the ability to know what data any app on the Watch is collecting and what it is doing with it. We have this problem now with all smart devices but you need to go to third party tools like Appthority to even begin to understand those threats. Some enterprise organizations will want to be able to control which sensors are active based on the device’s location or time-of-day and MDM would be the best tool for managing that,” Haviland said.

And then there are the risks that Bluetooth brings. Bluetooth has been compromised before. Kaspersky has a detailed blog post about the vulnerabilities of the protocol, including a hack that would allow an attacker to take control of a user’s phone via Bluetooth. Then there are, of course, security issues involving NFC, which is also being incorporated into the Apple Watch.

Of course, we have had smartwatches on the market for some time now, like the Samsung’s Galaxy Gear and its Tizen-based successors. Yet, the wearable form factor has not really crossed into the enterprise space. The consensus in the industry is that business adoption is imminent.

Apple review, Apple commentary, Apple news... Everything Apple“We have heard plenty of talk amongst enterprise clients that they want to include wearables, in general, into their solution designs,” said Haviland. “A hands-free interface and health information can be very valuable when you are trying to support people in dangerous or physically challenging situations so the future demand is there.”

If one wearable stands to speed up enterprise adoption, it will be the Apple Watch in the same way Apple made the tablet ubiquitous in the enterprise with the iPad.

Start Planning Now
That means business IT needs to think seriously about how the Apple Watch and other wearables fit into an existing MDM strategy. Think, but not panic. “As long as the iPhone is secure I don’t really see the watch posing a big problem,” for security, said Volkmer.

Foreseeably, businesses that already have MDM in place for the personal mobile devices employees connect to the corporate network have a head start on being prepared for the inevitable deluge of Apple Watches in the workplace. As for others, the launch of a wearable device from Apple next year should get them started on plans and policies on how to manage this device on the business network.